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Championship Productions Featured Items!

older | 1 | .... | 3 | 4 | (Page 5)

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    with Mike Perez,
    Lynn University Men's & Women's Head Coach;
    7x National Championship Coach; over 1,000 career wins;
    3x NAIA National Coach of the Year; 2006 ITA National Coach of the Year (Men's);
    14x Sunshine State Conference Champions; 10x Sunshine State Conference Coach of the Year;
    Named the NAIA Coach of the Decade (1990-2000)

    Often, tennis coaches at all levels must conduct team practice with a mixture of male and female players. A common challenge is learning how to conduct an effective practice that challenges all players of varying abilities. As head coach of both the men's and women's teams at Lynn University, Mike Perez has developed a method to solve this challenge. Using a variety of fitness, dead ball, and soft ball drills, the Lynn University tennis teams shows how a co-ed practice that is challenging and fun for everyone can be conducted.

    In this video, both the men's and women's teams cooperate in a short, intense practice focused on fitness and agility. Coach Perez brings the intensity in a focused, disciplined one hour practice, where players get the most out of individualized coaching and coaches get max effort from players.

    Fitness Drills

    Lynn University athletes demonstrate a full warm-up and fitness routine. See how Coach Perez combines fitness and skill development to create a high level of energy within a short amount of time. These exercises are an ideal way to begin an on-court session.

    Footwork Exercises

    Coach Perez is a strong believer in the importance of working on footwork and fitness. He guides his athletes through core footwork exercises, including:

    • Agility ladder exercises with emphasis on good technique
    • Footwork patterns such as figure 8's where Coach Perez gives his tips on maintaining good form

    Dead Ball and Hand-Feed Drills

    Dead ball drills are vital to build good fundamentals and are a situation where both male and female tennis players can participate together. Coach Perez shows his favorite practice patterns and guides players through utilizing a large variety of spins and ball trajectories. As practice is conducted, Perez gives his thoughts on how to troubleshoot technique.

    Serves and Returns Practices

    Coach Perez shows his preferred methods for practicing the serve and return of serve. Along the way, he gives great insight on simple fixes and adjustments that can be made when a player is having serve problems.

    Soft Ball Competition

    Soft ball competition allows men and women to practice together. The emphasis is on utilizing good footwork and prioritizing technique over power. Coach Perez guides players through a variety of competitive drills which allow males and females to compete against each other while still giving everyone a valuable practice session.

    Coach Perez gives you the tools to conduct an effective co-ed practice. Additionally, you'll gain great insight into his coaching techniques, which have led to great success for Lynn University tennis.

    53 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Mike Perez,
    Lynn University Men's & Women's Head Coach;
    7x National Championship Coach; over 1,000 career wins;
    3x NAIA National Coach of the Year; 2006 ITA National Coach of the Year (Men's);
    14x Sunshine State Conference Champions; 10x Sunshine State Conference Coach of the Year;
    Named the NAIA Coach of the Decade (1990-2000)

    Tennis players are becoming more athletic and more aggressive in their play. Coaches need to develop aggressive match play strategies that take advantage of this change in mindset and player ability to reflect the more modern game.

    Coach Perez welcomes you into one of his practices where after a dynamic and match style warm-up, he runs his players through six competitive match play drills for developing an aggressive mindset. The practice includes 2-on-2 and 2-on-1 offense/defense doubles drills, 1-on-1 and 2-on-1 ground sequence drills, first serve competitions, and live points. Coach Perez demonstrates how he incorporates each of these drills into a practice 1-2 days before a match and gives detailed instruction into the purpose of each drill, as well as strategy tips for each technique as he coaches his own players.

    Competitive Doubles Drills

    Learn two offense/defense drills that will help you attack your opponents more frequently and effectively, while also improving your defense against similar attacking teams. Coach Perez explains his philosophy behind this style of play and demonstrates how he works to accomplish this through competitive practice drills, such as:

    • 2-on-2 offense/defense drill that allows you to work on both doubles partners playing the net at the same time.
    • A progression of the 2-on-2 offense/defense drill that's a 2-on-1 drill with two players at the net and one at the baseline.
    • Attacking the net 35-40% of the time.

    Ground Sequence

    Learn a sequence of two partner drills on the baseline that focuses on identifying your opponent's weakness and exploiting it. Coach Perez explains his philosophy on singles play from the baseline, which include:

    • Every player has a weak side and players need to look to exploit that weak side on every shot.
    • Players must look to move their opponent around the court.
    • Players must be able to develop accuracy and always look to get balls in play to become a more consistent baseline player.
    • Playing balls that are out in practice to allow players to get more reps and improve their ability to return tough shots.

    First Serve Competition Drill

    Coach Perez ties everything together in the last third of his practice with live points from solid ground play to aggressively attacking the net. He modifies the rules to his live points, only allowing one serve, to emphasize specific areas of match play for his players:

    • Putting more pressure on their 2nd serve ability, as Coach Perez believes a player is only as good as their second serve.
    • Attacking weak second serves and getting to the net with regularity.
    • Attacking an opponent's weakness from the baseline.
    • Utilizing "sudden victory" scoring to put more pressure and a sense of urgency on his players.

    Coach Perez gives you an extensive look at how to run a competitive practice that allows you to develop your players while teaching them an aggressive attacking style of play. This video gives you a practice that can be utilized at any time during your season, and is great as you prepare for match play.

    57 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Mike Perez,
    Lynn University Men's & Women's Head Coach;
    7x National Championship Coach; over 1,000 career wins;
    3x NAIA National Coach of the Year; 2006 ITA National Coach of the Year (Men's);
    14x Sunshine State Conference Champions; 10x Sunshine State Conference Coach of the Year;
    Named the NAIA Coach of the Decade (1990-2000)

    In today's tennis, most of the points are won from the baseline, often after long and energy-demanding rallies. The serious and highly competitive player knows that to increase their chance of success, they must have a complete arsenal and the ability to play well in any area of the court.

    In this video, seven-time National Championship coach Mike Perez explains drills and patterns through which to play attacking tennis in the modern game, and the benefits that result from this style of play. He divides the video into three main sections, with each section filmed on court:

    • Approach Shot / Passing Shot
    • Set Plays
    • Team Tennis

    Coach Perez presents clear ideas on the vulnerability that players have to being attacked and pressured, including tall players, players who have exceptional quickness and players who have a weaker groundstroke or extreme grip on the racquet. You'll have the chance to learn the coaching strategies that prove most effective in both live ball drills and in competitive tiebreakers within team practice.

    Approach Shot / Passing Shot

    Under the supervision of Coach Perez, players execute approach patterns designed to exploit the opponent's weaknesses and build the opportunity to finish the point with a solid and efficient net game. This includes:

    • How to approach the net, where to hit the first volley and where to hit the second and definitive volley
    • Knowing how and where to direct the approach shot and the subsequent volley to successfully end points sooner

    Set Plays

    To win the decisive points and become a stronger player, you must execute a plan already trained several times previously. Coach Perez gives you pre-planned ideas on what to do in pressure situations. This gives your athletes a clear decision-making process and eliminates doubt in crucial situations. You'll see six set plays where six possible scenarios of crucial points are shown. These drills are useful to train a player's mindset and technique and get used to playing decisive points with more consistent success.

    Team Tennis

    In this part of the video, all the concepts explained in previous sections are applied together in realistic points played while Coach Perez offers more insights and strategies.

    Fitness and Strength Drills

    See a structured way to implement footwork drills at the beginning of your practice sessions to prepare athletes to move well and stay injury-free on the tennis court. The use of agility ladders and cones to enhance player movement warms up both the body and the mind in preparation for a practice session. Coach Perez also provides a series of core exercises, including many variations of planks and crunches, in order to keep your players strong and fit in the vital trunk area of the body.

    Coach Perez does an excellent job of showing how you can adapt attacking tennis into today's game. His positivity and attention to detail within points and drills brings the best out in his players and will help you do the same for yours as well!

    50 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Kris Kwinta,
    University of Southern California Associate Head Men's Tennis Coach;
    2x ITA Southwest Region Assistant Coach of the Year; All-American player at UCLA;
    former member of the Polish National Team; represented Poland at the Davis Cup in doubles

    At USC, a key component of tennis practice is having drills that are competitive in nature. When drills are competitive and pressure situations are created, tennis players will be more serious and more intense in their approach.

    In this video, USC Associate Head Coach Kris Kwinta shows his favorite drills for tennis practice. You'll get 16 competitive warm-up, fed, and live ball drills that will add variety to your practices while building skills within a highly competitive structure.

    Warm-Up Drills with Competitive Focus

    Coach Kwinta guides USC players through a series of unique games and drills that emphasize balance, footwork and touch - all with a competitive angle - that will have your players laughing and sweating at the same time. These drills require the honing of tennis-specific movements out of context, which engages and motivates players. Kwinta includes several non-traditional methods, such as:

    • Utilizing medicine balls in competitive games, which simulates good stroke production
    • A soccer-style game on the court that emphasizes control, balance, movement, and getting behind the ball

    By using these drills, players develop good footwork, movement and touch.

    Tennis Practice Drills

    Coach Kwinta introduces a series of drills using cones and targets to improve accuracy with the ball. Again, all drills are competitive and will keep your players engaged while providing specific objectives. Drills include:

    • Short court drills that develop movement
    • Full court drills for both two and four players that focus on movement and maintaining high intensity
    • Cross-court and down the line cone drills to train court positioning and contact points
    • Game-play drills that simulate pressure situations in a real match
    • Serve and return of serve drills that are fun and competitive

    Additionally, Kwinta provides you with different end-of practice set and game scenarios in which players will be placed under pressure and required to use and develop decision-making skills while fatigued.

    Coach Kwinta will help you install a competitive focus in your tennis drills. This video is sure to help your players be more focused when the match is on the line.

    81 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Peter Smith,
    University of Southern California Men's Tennis Coach; over 500 career wins;
    2014 NCAA Champions; 5x NCAA Champions, including Back-to-Back-to-Back-to-Back (2009/2010/2011/2012) titles;
    5x Pac-10 Coach of the Year; 2011 USPTA National College "Coach of the Year"; 2x Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) "Coach of the Year" (2010 & 2012)

    Teaching doubles technique and strategy has become a vital component for team success, from high school up through college. In this video, five-time NCAA championship coach Peter Smith demonstrates the same progression of competitive drills and match play situations that he uses with his team that have allowed them to continue their dominance of the Pac-12.

    Coach Smith walks through a warm up, doubles-specific drills, and three-player drills. Each of these drills have variations and progressions to improve doubles play tactically and technically. The video focuses on isolating parts of the court to help players develop skills of serving, returning, volleying and ground strokes. Using a combination of instruction, competition and repetition, Coach Smith's methods will help players at all levels improve their game.

    Dynamic Warm-Up

    Coach Smith stresses the importance of getting the body warm with a sequence of dynamic stretches that target the legs, hips, and shoulders. Special attention is given to warming up the shoulders and rotator cuff using a resistance band to reduce the chance of injury. This dynamic routine will ensure that your team is prepared physically to hit the court running.

    The USC Warm-Up

    In this segment, Coach Smith reinforces the importance of shot selection and the smaller details in doubles tennis during their warm-up. He puts his team through a sequence of the following shots:

    • Bounce overheads
    • Defensive lobs
    • Offensive top spin lobs
    • Slice backhands
    • Volleys

    Coach Smith stresses hitting a variety of shots as a doubles player, noting that this sequence has helped his players throughout the years learn how to mix it up during match play. Each shot is only hit for 1-2 minutes.

    Doubles Drills Series

    Practice progresses into a 2-on-2 doubles series - the same series Coach Smith uses with his team immediately before they begin match play. Continually stressing the importance of making each drill competitive (games to 5 or 7), Coach Smith puts his team through the following drills:

    • Poaching - With all four players at the service line, Coach Smith feeds through the middle to emphasize the importance of stepping in. Coach Smith prioritizes moving with the feet (not lunging with the arms) and the importance of keeping the ball out of the net.
    • Poaching, Crossing - This drill simulates the return and the returner's partner crossing. Coach Smith feeds the return to the oncoming server, who returns cross court to get Coach Smith's partner to poach. Coach Smith stresses the importance of moving on an `L', not on a diagonal.
    • Two Up, Two Back - This drill stresses the importance of closing the net and taking away the middle.

    Match Play Drills

    Moving from the Doubles Drills Series, Coach Smith takes you through a series of drills that help isolate, focus, and emphasize the importance of the first four shots in a doubles point. As Coach Smith states, 80% or more of doubles points will be decided in these first shots. Each drill gives opportunity for team work, communication, poaching, defending and attacking the ball.

    • Serve and Volley Cross Court - This drill isolates the serve, the return, and the third ball. Every ball is played cross court in a 1-on-1 situation. Coach Smith emphasizes the importance of serving to the body in doubles. Learn the signaling system Coach Smith incorporates with his doubles teams to stress the importance of serve placement and net movement.
    • One Up, One Back - This drill focuses on the importance of, again, stepping in and through the middle. It alternates from the coach feeding the serve to the coach feeding the return.
    • Offense, Defense - This 1-on-1 competitive drill emphasizes the importance of closing the net, as points can only be won at the net.

    Group Games

    Most tennis coaches deal with managing a large amount of players on one court at the same time. Coach Smith takes you through drills he uses at his academy and during practice play that can help you through large-number situations:

    • Overheads
    • Overheads/Poach
    • Poach Drill
    • Forehand Poaches
    • Approach Shots
    • Live Ball

    Three Man Doubles Drills

    Learn an innovative approach to working with your doubles teams. By taking away the fourth player, Coach Smith shows you a sequence of drills that again focus on the first shots, which are crucial to doubles success:

    • Serve and Volley
    • Straight Up
    • Modern I
    • Traditional I
    • Straight Up with a Poach or Fake
    • Coach is the Returner
    • Isolation Drill

    Tennis coaches of all levels are always looking for new and innovative methods for teaching doubles play. After viewing this video, you will have more than enough tools to help take your doubles teams to the next level!

    "I have been looking for a doubles video that gives an intense and efficient way to focus on what really matters in doubles match play, this video is it. Players keep pace and challenge each other to make it pay off on match day." - Customer Review

    69 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    TND-05132A:

    with Peter Smith,
    University of Southern California Men's Tennis Coach; over 500 career wins;
    2014 NCAA Champions; 5x NCAA Champions, including Back-to-Back-to-Back-to-Back (2009/2010/2011/2012) titles;
    5x Pac-10 Coach of the Year; 2011 USPTA National College "Coach of the Year"; 2x Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) "Coach of the Year" (2010 & 2012)

    Teaching doubles technique and strategy has become a vital component for team success, from high school up through college. In this video, five-time NCAA championship coach Peter Smith demonstrates the same progression of competitive drills and match play situations that he uses with his team that have allowed them to continue their dominance of the Pac-12.

    Coach Smith walks through a warm up, doubles-specific drills, and three-player drills. Each of these drills have variations and progressions to improve doubles play tactically and technically. The video focuses on isolating parts of the court to help players develop skills of serving, returning, volleying and ground strokes. Using a combination of instruction, competition and repetition, Coach Smith's methods will help players at all levels improve their game.

    Dynamic Warm-Up

    Coach Smith stresses the importance of getting the body warm with a sequence of dynamic stretches that target the legs, hips, and shoulders. Special attention is given to warming up the shoulders and rotator cuff using a resistance band to reduce the chance of injury. This dynamic routine will ensure that your team is prepared physically to hit the court running.

    The USC Warm-Up

    In this segment, Coach Smith reinforces the importance of shot selection and the smaller details in doubles tennis during their warm-up. He puts his team through a sequence of the following shots:

    • Bounce overheads
    • Defensive lobs
    • Offensive top spin lobs
    • Slice backhands
    • Volleys

    Coach Smith stresses hitting a variety of shots as a doubles player, noting that this sequence has helped his players throughout the years learn how to mix it up during match play. Each shot is only hit for 1-2 minutes.

    Doubles Drills Series

    Practice progresses into a 2-on-2 doubles series - the same series Coach Smith uses with his team immediately before they begin match play. Continually stressing the importance of making each drill competitive (games to 5 or 7), Coach Smith puts his team through the following drills:

    • Poaching - With all four players at the service line, Coach Smith feeds through the middle to emphasize the importance of stepping in. Coach Smith prioritizes moving with the feet (not lunging with the arms) and the importance of keeping the ball out of the net.
    • Poaching, Crossing - This drill simulates the return and the returner's partner crossing. Coach Smith feeds the return to the oncoming server, who returns cross court to get Coach Smith's partner to poach. Coach Smith stresses the importance of moving on an `L', not on a diagonal.
    • Two Up, Two Back - This drill stresses the importance of closing the net and taking away the middle.

    Match Play Drills

    Moving from the Doubles Drills Series, Coach Smith takes you through a series of drills that help isolate, focus, and emphasize the importance of the first four shots in a doubles point. As Coach Smith states, 80% or more of doubles points will be decided in these first shots. Each drill gives opportunity for team work, communication, poaching, defending and attacking the ball.

    • Serve and Volley Cross Court - This drill isolates the serve, the return, and the third ball. Every ball is played cross court in a 1-on-1 situation. Coach Smith emphasizes the importance of serving to the body in doubles. Learn the signaling system Coach Smith incorporates with his doubles teams to stress the importance of serve placement and net movement.
    • One Up, One Back - This drill focuses on the importance of, again, stepping in and through the middle. It alternates from the coach feeding the serve to the coach feeding the return.
    • Offense, Defense - This 1-on-1 competitive drill emphasizes the importance of closing the net, as points can only be won at the net.

    Group Games

    Most tennis coaches deal with managing a large amount of players on one court at the same time. Coach Smith takes you through drills he uses at his academy and during practice play that can help you through large-number situations:

    • Overheads
    • Overheads/Poach
    • Poach Drill
    • Forehand Poaches
    • Approach Shots
    • Live Ball

    Three Man Doubles Drills

    Learn an innovative approach to working with your doubles teams. By taking away the fourth player, Coach Smith shows you a sequence of drills that again focus on the first shots, which are crucial to doubles success:

    • Serve and Volley
    • Straight Up
    • Modern I
    • Traditional I
    • Straight Up with a Poach or Fake
    • Coach is the Returner
    • Isolation Drill

    Tennis coaches of all levels are always looking for new and innovative methods for teaching doubles play. After viewing this video, you will have more than enough tools to help take your doubles teams to the next level!

    "I have been looking for a doubles video that gives an intense and efficient way to focus on what really matters in doubles match play, this video is it. Players keep pace and challenge each other to make it pay off on match day." - Customer Review

    69 minutes. 2017.



    TND-05132B:

    with Kris Kwinta,
    University of Southern California Associate Head Men's Tennis Coach;
    2x ITA Southwest Region Assistant Coach of the Year; All-American player at UCLA;
    former member of the Polish National Team; represented Poland at the Davis Cup in doubles

    At USC, a key component of tennis practice is having drills that are competitive in nature. When drills are competitive and pressure situations are created, tennis players will be more serious and more intense in their approach.

    In this video, USC Associate Head Coach Kris Kwinta shows his favorite drills for tennis practice. You'll get 16 competitive warm-up, fed, and live ball drills that will add variety to your practices while building skills within a highly competitive structure.

    Warm-Up Drills with Competitive Focus

    Coach Kwinta guides USC players through a series of unique games and drills that emphasize balance, footwork and touch - all with a competitive angle - that will have your players laughing and sweating at the same time. These drills require the honing of tennis-specific movements out of context, which engages and motivates players. Kwinta includes several non-traditional methods, such as:

    • Utilizing medicine balls in competitive games, which simulates good stroke production
    • A soccer-style game on the court that emphasizes control, balance, movement, and getting behind the ball

    By using these drills, players develop good footwork, movement and touch.

    Tennis Practice Drills

    Coach Kwinta introduces a series of drills using cones and targets to improve accuracy with the ball. Again, all drills are competitive and will keep your players engaged while providing specific objectives. Drills include:

    • Short court drills that develop movement
    • Full court drills for both two and four players that focus on movement and maintaining high intensity
    • Cross-court and down the line cone drills to train court positioning and contact points
    • Game-play drills that simulate pressure situations in a real match
    • Serve and return of serve drills that are fun and competitive

    Additionally, Kwinta provides you with different end-of practice set and game scenarios in which players will be placed under pressure and required to use and develop decision-making skills while fatigued.

    Coach Kwinta will help you install a competitive focus in your tennis drills. This video is sure to help your players be more focused when the match is on the line.

    81 minutes. 2017.




    0 0

    with David Roditi,
    TCU Head Men's Tennis Coach;
    2017 Big 12 Coach of the Year - 3x Big 12 Coach of the Year;
    Back-to-Back Big 12 Champions (2016-17);
    2015 Wilson/ITA National Coach of the Year;
    3x All-American at TCU - holds the school record for combined career victories

    Working with a team or a large group of tennis players can be a challenge for a coach. In this video, David Roditi shows you how to incorporate various warm-up drills and competitive games that can help coaches utilize court space more effectively and efficiently.

    Tennis Warm-up

    Coach Roditi demonstrates the value of mentally engaging your players as soon as they are on the court. Beginning with slice games, players immediately focus on proper grip and technique as they get their minds and bodies ready for practice. Roditi emphasizes the importance of the Continental grip during both the slice games and volley progression component of the warm-up, as these shots are under-practiced and under-utilized by most coaches.

    Tennis Practice Games

    After warming up, Roditi continues to engage his players mentally with the Bounce and Hit drill, a drill that requires his players to use their voice and mind to stay mentally engaged with their groundstrokes. Combined with baseline target practice and shot combination sequences, Roditi ensures his athletes are every bit as focused on the mental component as the physical.

    Tennis Control Drills

    Many times, players are concerned with how hard they hit the ball and not where they hit it. In this section, Coach Roditi shows the value of shot placement with the 2 Cross, 1 Down the Line drill. As his athletes demonstrate the drill, you will learn specific shot selection patterns and techniques - a must for more experienced singles player.

    Court Coverage

    At the end of the video, you will learn two games - 3 vs. 3 and Speed Singles, both of which will help your athletes understand the value of court coverage, shot selection, and racket speed - all while having fun competing! This is a great way to close practice and will have an immediate impact on the movement and competitive spirit of your team.

    Coach Roditi provides a series of drills, technique demonstrations, and games that will allow coaches of all levels the opportunity to improve their team. His energy, enthusiasm, and passion for teaching the game are felt through every second of this video.

    70 minutes. 2018.


    0 0

    with David Roditi,
    TCU Head Men's Tennis Coach;
    2017 Big 12 Coach of the Year - 3x Big 12 Coach of the Year;
    Back-to-Back Big 12 Champions (2016-17);
    2015 Wilson/ITA National Coach of the Year;
    3x All-American at TCU - holds the school record for combined career victories

    Developing an all-court game is more valuable than ever, as today's athletes are becoming stronger and more athletic. Learning the finer points of the fundamentals that are essential for the groundstroke, volley, and serve are vital for today's modern player!

    TCU head coach David Roditi shows detailed and easy-to-follow progressions for groundstrokes, volleys, transition shots, and the serve that build solid fundamentals on all strokes. No matter what level a student is at, they can quickly build their skills on the court by following Coach Roditi's progressions. Roditi has developed a practice plan that is fun and has a mix of cooperative and competitive drills.

    Along the way, Roditi provides several insightful tips that he has learned both in his playing career and as a coach. He gives valuable instruction on hitting balls with more power and spin, as well as his favorite strategies for match play.

    Swing Progression - Groundstrokes

    Roditi demonstrates the importance of knowing when to hit the right shot, depending on the shot you get from your opponent. By stressing the values of 'lifting' and 'driving,' Roditi allows his players to learn how to control points during match play. Starting first with simple ball feeds and then progressing to live ball drills, a player works on emphasizing drive and power when the ball is rising and then works on lifting the ball when the ball is falling.

    Along the way, Roditi provides several valuable tips on how to adjust stroke technique based on your intent. By emphasizing shot selection, Roditi is able to reinforce proper head and body movement as well. Roditi applies these concepts both in isolation and live ball drills, allowing the player to learn as they play. The structure of the drills is such that there are both cooperative and competitive play.

    Hitting Progression - Racket Speed

    Coach Roditi explains and shows how to work on racquet head speed. Starting with the key concept to aim for different parts of the ball depending on whether the player gets a high or low ball, Roditi outlines a progressive system to build racquet head speed.

    • Hand feeds - Players start with very simple feeds and work on hitting outside or inside of ball.
    • Cooperative drills - Players work on hitting versus faster paced balls with a variety of spins and heights.
    • Competitive hitting games - Once students have mastered a feel for hitting inside or outside of the ball based on height, they progress to point play to develop more advanced strategy in matches.
    • Teaching your players when to hit outside vs. inside will have them more focused on how the ball is not only coming off their racket, but how it finishes on the other side of the net. Roditi applies these concepts from the baseline and transitions seamlessly into the approach and net game fundamentals as well.

      Volley Progressions

      Coach Roditi shows how to handle two different volley types:

      • Deeper volleys that are typically hit from behind the service line and require more power.
      • Softer volleys when athletes are closer to the net and need to be more focused more on spin, feel, and touch with the hands.

      Roditi explains optimal positioning based on where the ball is on opponent's side, and provides training for the approach shot. You'll see an effective use of the slice as an approach shot to set up an easy volley winner, as well as drills to fix common errors made when hitting approach shots.

      Service Motion

      Are your players using the correct grip? When they miss a serve, is it in the net or deep in the court? In this section, Roditi demonstrates how to get your players to use the appropriate Continental grip, along with emphasizing the 12 o'clock contact point. You will learn the techniques and fundamentals necessary to get your players to hit up (not out) on their motion - ultimately resulting in higher serving percentages for your team. He provides drills to develop more use of the legs and the core to maximize power and spin, which are critical components for the kick serve.

      Coach Roditi provides a framework that allows you to help improve every player's skills from beginners up to your most advanced tennis players. He provides extensive detail with the types of shots necessary for today's modern athlete. You will learn fundamentals, progression teaching, and an overall philosophy for player development that will pay immediate dividends for you and your athletes!

      "I have been to many clinics and seen many instructional videos and can say without hesitation that this was one of the best. As a coach, I am always looking for advanced techniques, drills, and strategies to give to my more advanced players. In this video, Coach Roditi gives me in-depth analysis for all the shots required to be successful in today's game. A must-view for every high school or collegiate coach!" - Karl Buck, Head Boys' & Girls' Tennis Coach, Mountain Range High School

      86 minutes. 2018.


    0 0

    TND-05311A:

    with David Roditi,
    TCU Head Men's Tennis Coach;
    2017 Big 12 Coach of the Year - 3x Big 12 Coach of the Year;
    Back-to-Back Big 12 Champions (2016-17);
    2015 Wilson/ITA National Coach of the Year;
    3x All-American at TCU - holds the school record for combined career victories

    Developing an all-court game is more valuable than ever, as today's athletes are becoming stronger and more athletic. Learning the finer points of the fundamentals that are essential for the groundstroke, volley, and serve are vital for today's modern player!

    TCU head coach David Roditi shows detailed and easy-to-follow progressions for groundstrokes, volleys, transition shots, and the serve that build solid fundamentals on all strokes. No matter what level a student is at, they can quickly build their skills on the court by following Coach Roditi's progressions. Roditi has developed a practice plan that is fun and has a mix of cooperative and competitive drills.

    Along the way, Roditi provides several insightful tips that he has learned both in his playing career and as a coach. He gives valuable instruction on hitting balls with more power and spin, as well as his favorite strategies for match play.

    Swing Progression - Groundstrokes

    Roditi demonstrates the importance of knowing when to hit the right shot, depending on the shot you get from your opponent. By stressing the values of 'lifting' and 'driving,' Roditi allows his players to learn how to control points during match play. Starting first with simple ball feeds and then progressing to live ball drills, a player works on emphasizing drive and power when the ball is rising and then works on lifting the ball when the ball is falling.

    Along the way, Roditi provides several valuable tips on how to adjust stroke technique based on your intent. By emphasizing shot selection, Roditi is able to reinforce proper head and body movement as well. Roditi applies these concepts both in isolation and live ball drills, allowing the player to learn as they play. The structure of the drills is such that there are both cooperative and competitive play.

    Hitting Progression - Racket Speed

    Coach Roditi explains and shows how to work on racquet head speed. Starting with the key concept to aim for different parts of the ball depending on whether the player gets a high or low ball, Roditi outlines a progressive system to build racquet head speed.

    • Hand feeds - Players start with very simple feeds and work on hitting outside or inside of ball.
    • Cooperative drills - Players work on hitting versus faster paced balls with a variety of spins and heights.
    • Competitive hitting games - Once students have mastered a feel for hitting inside or outside of the ball based on height, they progress to point play to develop more advanced strategy in matches.
    • Teaching your players when to hit outside vs. inside will have them more focused on how the ball is not only coming off their racket, but how it finishes on the other side of the net. Roditi applies these concepts from the baseline and transitions seamlessly into the approach and net game fundamentals as well.

      Volley Progressions

      Coach Roditi shows how to handle two different volley types:

      • Deeper volleys that are typically hit from behind the service line and require more power.
      • Softer volleys when athletes are closer to the net and need to be more focused more on spin, feel, and touch with the hands.

      Roditi explains optimal positioning based on where the ball is on opponent's side, and provides training for the approach shot. You'll see an effective use of the slice as an approach shot to set up an easy volley winner, as well as drills to fix common errors made when hitting approach shots.

      Service Motion

      Are your players using the correct grip? When they miss a serve, is it in the net or deep in the court? In this section, Roditi demonstrates how to get your players to use the appropriate Continental grip, along with emphasizing the 12 o'clock contact point. You will learn the techniques and fundamentals necessary to get your players to hit up (not out) on their motion - ultimately resulting in higher serving percentages for your team. He provides drills to develop more use of the legs and the core to maximize power and spin, which are critical components for the kick serve.

      Coach Roditi provides a framework that allows you to help improve every player's skills from beginners up to your most advanced tennis players. He provides extensive detail with the types of shots necessary for today's modern athlete. You will learn fundamentals, progression teaching, and an overall philosophy for player development that will pay immediate dividends for you and your athletes!

      "I have been to many clinics and seen many instructional videos and can say without hesitation that this was one of the best. As a coach, I am always looking for advanced techniques, drills, and strategies to give to my more advanced players. In this video, Coach Roditi gives me in-depth analysis for all the shots required to be successful in today's game. A must-view for every high school or collegiate coach!" - Karl Buck, Head Boys' & Girls' Tennis Coach, Mountain Range High School

      86 minutes. 2018.



      TND-05311B:

      with David Roditi,
      TCU Head Men's Tennis Coach;
      2017 Big 12 Coach of the Year - 3x Big 12 Coach of the Year;
      Back-to-Back Big 12 Champions (2016-17);
      2015 Wilson/ITA National Coach of the Year;
      3x All-American at TCU - holds the school record for combined career victories

      Working with a team or a large group of tennis players can be a challenge for a coach. In this video, David Roditi shows you how to incorporate various warm-up drills and competitive games that can help coaches utilize court space more effectively and efficiently.

      Tennis Warm-up

      Coach Roditi demonstrates the value of mentally engaging your players as soon as they are on the court. Beginning with slice games, players immediately focus on proper grip and technique as they get their minds and bodies ready for practice. Roditi emphasizes the importance of the Continental grip during both the slice games and volley progression component of the warm-up, as these shots are under-practiced and under-utilized by most coaches.

      Tennis Practice Games

      After warming up, Roditi continues to engage his players mentally with the Bounce and Hit drill, a drill that requires his players to use their voice and mind to stay mentally engaged with their groundstrokes. Combined with baseline target practice and shot combination sequences, Roditi ensures his athletes are every bit as focused on the mental component as the physical.

      Tennis Control Drills

      Many times, players are concerned with how hard they hit the ball and not where they hit it. In this section, Coach Roditi shows the value of shot placement with the 2 Cross, 1 Down the Line drill. As his athletes demonstrate the drill, you will learn specific shot selection patterns and techniques - a must for more experienced singles player.

      Court Coverage

      At the end of the video, you will learn two games - 3 vs. 3 and Speed Singles, both of which will help your athletes understand the value of court coverage, shot selection, and racket speed - all while having fun competing! This is a great way to close practice and will have an immediate impact on the movement and competitive spirit of your team.

      Coach Roditi provides a series of drills, technique demonstrations, and games that will allow coaches of all levels the opportunity to improve their team. His energy, enthusiasm, and passion for teaching the game are felt through every second of this video.

      70 minutes. 2018.




    0 0

    with Peter Smith,
    University of Southern California Men's Tennis Coach;
    over 500 career wins;
    2014 NCAA Champions;
    5x NCAA Champions, including Back-to-Back-to-Back-to-Back (2009/2010/2011/2012) titles;
    5x Pac-10 Coach of the Year;
    2011 & 2014 USPTA National College "Coach of the Year";
    2x Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) "Coach of the Year" (2010 & 2012)

    Decorated USC head coach Peter Smith teaches you about the most important shot in tennis: the serve. The serve is the only shot that you have 100% control over during a given point. This video is greatly beneficial for individuals and teams looking to improve their game by learning tips and drills that are used by one of the best collegiate programs in the country.

    Breaking Down the Serve

    Coach Smith breaks down the basic fundamentals and techniques needed to maximize your serve's potential. You'll see him explain the analogy of how a serve is closely related to throwing a football or baseball. Smith also covers two types of stance, the continental grip, placement of the toss, how to generate power, and finishing the swing.

    Types of Serves

    While power is important, Smith places a higher priority on the placement and the spin of the serve. He has his players demonstrate three types of serves and the keys to each of them.

    Serves covered include:

    • Flat - When you're trying to beat someone with pure speed.
    • Slice - Ideal for doubles, when you're trying to generate some movement.
    • Kick - When you want height, security, and movement.

    Smith ends the segment by talking about common mistakes that players make on each serve and how to fix them on the court.

    Serving Drills

    The last portion of this video includes different drills that individuals and teams can use that are fun, competitive, and will provide repetitions for each type of serve. You'll learn the following drills:

    • Target Serving
    • Target Serving Competition
    • Towel Hop Drill
    • Kneeling Serves
    • Coil Serves
    • Wall Taps

    The serve is the most important shot in the game and USC's Peter Smith breaks down all of the different parts of the serve that are essential to achieve mastery. This video features great breakdowns and drills for players of all skill levels!

    46 minutes. 2018.


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